But it might be even stronger if it had some details specific to life at BC—a club the student envisions joining where she could share her “understanding of cultural nuances and values of high expectations, bravery, and self-awareness,” or a course she wants to take where class discussions would benefit from her perspective. For this student, it was the anecdote about helping campers “take on challenges like rock climbing or the ropes course, especially those wary of new experiences,” and also embracing differences. Another way to evaluate whether it’s the right choice is to consider your Common App application as a whole—your personal statement, Activities List, and Additional Information section. This question closely resembles prompt 1 on the Common Application, which means it’s as close as you’ll get to a “topic of your choice” option on the BC supplement. Boston College will give me countless opportunities to thrive and grow not just as a student, but also as a mentor, storyteller, athlete, and Eagle. Whatever works! Tens of thousands of students use Prompt’s web application to help them write more compelling college essays and stay on task with Prompt’s college application to-do lists based on every application requirement for every school. Yes, it’s important to write about the courses, programs, and majors/minors you’re interested in—after all, this is a college education we’re talking about. Jesuits! Even better: Those details will give admission reps a nice glimpse of what life as an Eagle would look like for you. Spend some time on the school website and dig to the nitty gritty of the programs, offices, and traditions that interest you. Get specific. The variety makes for a fun read. Think not just of the most recent books you’ve read and songs you’ve listened to, but also of the old classics you can’t help rereading (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone) or songs that never get old (“Wannabe” by the Spice Girls). If you have answers to any of the questions above, chances are this may be a great prompt for you. Students applying to the HCE major must respond to prompt #5 only. Use your sample lectures and required reading to show your expertise, and range of interests. Her ideal day is spent playing Cribbage with her dad, beating her husband at RummiKub and planning the next girls trip with her teenage daughters. Students applying to the HCE major must respond to prompt #5 only. Does “Life is a Highway” by Rascall Flatts always put you in a great mood? That means conveying key values, especially those you share with BC. This essay is teeming with strong values: empathy, compassion, social change, curiosity, accountability, diversity, quality relationships, respect, love. As a volunteer at the Boys and Girls Club here in Southern California, I am able to put a smile on the faces of the kids I work with as well as help them get active with their peers. It’ll give you a great feel for the opportunity this prompt offers in showing how you and BC are the perfect match—how your interests, values, and goals (“your background, your experiences, your story”) are awash in maroon and gold (but don’t actually mention the school colors). This is the “Why us?” portion of the essay, and schools—BC included—like to see details and specifics that are unique to them. And there’s this, pulsing with oxymorons: “Why Fiction Feels So Real: Analyzing Silence.” This student is clearly having fun with his topic, and demonstrating craft and creativity for days. It also taught me to critically reflect upon my own values. I know I will be surrounded with like-minded people who push me to be the best version of myself, while also growing in independence being so far from home. Show your creative streak. All applicants, except those applying for the Human-Centered Engineering (HCE) major, should respond to one of prompts #1-4 listed below. Here are some tips to think about if you’re considering writing to this prompt: Pick a topic you know well. What has shaped you as a person, and how has that made your perspective unique? , which means it’s as close as you’ll get to a “topic of your choice” option on the BC supplement. When writing to this prompt, think of “us” not as BC but as “you + BC.” The key here is to a) share some experiences and what you’ve learned from them (the “you” part), then b) connect these experiences to particular opportunities available on the Boston College campus (the “+ BC” part). Pitch your course like your job depends on it. What do you believe and how will your worldview bring something of value to the community at Boston College? In between relevant musical choices that show his familiarity with the subject, like Schubert’s String Quartet No. What lessons have you learned from reading/hearing the piece that you’ve been able to apply elsewhere in your life? Did it inspire you in some meaningful way? In looking to my future as a storyteller, whether I’m producing blockbuster films or becoming a Classics professor, I am excited to write my own tale over the next four years. Do you read “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou before every debate competition to give yourself a refill of confidence and motivation? Watch the lessons on your own or via the live option. Where do you come from? It also can’t hurt to explore why your particular background or experience will be useful in an academic setting. When you choose a college, you will join a new community of people who have different backgrounds, experiences, and stories. Boston College Supplemental Essay Prompts All applicants, except those applying for the Human-Centered Engineering (HCE) major, should respond to one of prompts #1-4 listed below. Learn more here. It also can’t hurt to explore why your particular background or experience will be useful in an academic setting. Whether it's backpacking trips to the San Juans, my Outdoor Adventure class, or taking on a new academic challenge, I too enjoy venturing outside of my comfort zone. I get my can-do attitude from my Grandpa Kenneth, my mother's father. The second part is the “Why us?” Here’s a guide for that type of essay. By taking courses such as Roman Law and Family, I hope to learn from some of the greatest orators in Roman history while examining how laws and family dynamics influenced their society. The Fire Next Time has helped me find the balance between acknowledging strains in personal relationships while learning how to grow as an activist. They want you to have a well-rounded experience, and showing you’re interested in opportunities outside the classroom will show them your depth and range. These small differences have caused my father and I to disagree in some political conversations. Admissions readers want to understand why the college you’re applying to is a good fit for you. (400 words). Great art evokes a sense of wonder. Expressing vulnerability makes the essay more relatable, allowing the reader to connect with you on a more personal level. It might be something you go back to on a regular basis (for example, that song you just can’t go to sleep without listening to), or it might be something you read/heard/watched once that had a lasting effect on you (that mind-bending Doctor Who episode that changed your life three years ago). At the end of the day, your goal is to cram your essay with as many specific details as possible. The first is the “Why Major.” Here’s a guide to writing that portion. Simultaneously, through philosophical readings of Walton and Nietzsche, we will analyze the emotional and physiological effects of music, examining the dynamic interplay of visual and auditory elements. Think of this prompt in two parts.